GO BANANAS - THE LEARNING STATION - YouTube.

An idiom is a phrase, or a combination of words, that has developed a figurative meaning through frequency of use. Idioms are a staple in many different languages, and are often shared across languages through numerous translations. They can be useful and even fun to use, but are also bound to confuse any new speaker of a language who isn’t familiar with the phrase’s cultural relevance.

Origin. A common suggestion for the origin of go ape is that it came from the 1933 movie King Kong. The movie is about a giant ape who is captured and taken to New York, where it escapes its bonds and goes ape (using all possible meanings of the idiom). However the expression did not become used as slang until the 1950’s, so it is unlikely to.

What is the origin of the expression GOING BANANAS.

Driving me Bananas. Posted by Serge Liberman on February 19, 2005. In Reply to: Driving me Bananas posted by I.V.Holtzman on February 17, 2005. From the phrase-finder - Nov 14, 2003. Posted by ESC on November 14, 2003 In Reply to: Driving me Bananas posted by Monkey See on November 13, 2003.Going bananas Meaning: Go crazy Origin: According to lexicographer E.J. Lighter, going bananas refers to the term going ape often used in American popular culture in the second half of the 1900s. Apes were seen as crazy by the mid-century media, and what do apes eat? Bananas! Example: I will go bananas if you still acts like this. A banana skin.Definition. hot potato: A difficult situation or problem that people don't agree on and don't want to handle. Example sentences. In the USA, gun control remains a hot potato in politics — even after mass shootings at schools. Another hot potato in US politics is whether or not to keep abortion legal.; Raising salaries for non-managerial staff has become a hot potato at my office.


Alternate origin: Nails were in short supply and high demand in colonial times. People would go out in the night and steal the nails from their neighbors doors. To prevent this from happening, the ends of the nails inside, were bent and hammered down to prevent them from being pulled out, from the outside. The nail was said to be dead and the act was deadening the nail. It could not be removed.Meaning: To be greatly frustrated or annoyed. The word “nuts” is sometimes replaced by the words crazy, bonkers, bananas, insane, or up the wall. However, the meaning remains unchanged. When people are annoyed to the point where they can no longer tolerate anymore, they might use this common idiom to describe their frustration.

The expression is American slang meaning to go on a reckless debauch, to be wildly extravagant. Originally, the metaphor applied to bonfires painting the sky or scenery red. An old Irish ballad.

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An idiom is a phrase or expression that carries meaning that may not be self-evident. The expression might be so old that it’s origins have little meaning to us today, though the idiom still conveys value. While some British idioms translate to America, others are more difficult to decipher outside of UK culture. As such, we’ve found ten common British idioms and unraveled their meanings.

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Bananas definition, crazy; deranged: All that chatter is driving me bananas. See more.

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Go bananas definition is - to become very excited or angry. How to use go bananas in a sentence.

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Q From Nick Carrington: What's the origin of the phrase gone for a Burton, please?. A In informal British English, something that has gone for a Burton is broken, ruined or destroyed. The original sense was to meet one’s death, a slang term in the RAF in World War Two for pilots who were killed in action. RAF aircrew was noted for being extraordinarily superstitious and, as one part of this.

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Idioms can be very confusing to people who are learning a language. The pictures on this web site are of the literal meaning of the idiom, not the actual meaning in common use. If you want to see the actual meaning of the idiom you can use the letter menu above and click on the idiom you want to see or look below. All Idioms on this Site. a big wheel. a big wig. a bird in the hand is worth two.

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Go bananas - Excited or crazy. The dog was going bananas when the cat came into the house. In a pickle - In trouble. We were in a pickle when we got lost last night. Life is a bowl of cherries - Life is good and pleasant. He tried to convince her that life of a bowl of cherries in his new town. Like two peas in a pod - Very similar to another person. My aunt and mom are like two peas in a pod.

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Look at the picture and try to guess the meaning of hit the road idiom. Hmmm, it's not so easy to understand is it? But the photo can help you to remember it. Hit the road: to leave (especially to go home); to depart on a journey (especially to travel to a place by car). Notes: The guy in the photo is hitting (banging) a sledge hammer into the road. He's making a big hole in the road. That's a.

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Going bananas. Meaning: Go crazy Origin: According to lexicographer E.J. Lighter, going bananas refers to the term going ape often used in American popular culture in the second half of the 1900s. Apes were seen as crazy by the mid-century media, and what do apes eat? Bananas! Example: I will go bananas if you still acts like this. A banana skin. Meaning: something which causes or is very.

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Definition and synonyms of go nuts from the online English dictionary from Macmillan Education. This is the British English definition of go nuts.View American English definition of go nuts. Change your default dictionary to American English.

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